How to choose the right soap for your skin and the environment

Natural soaps beat the everyday drugstore options for more reasons than you might think. When it comes to choosing between liquids and bars, however, you might want to consider these four specific factors.

Though the labels often allude to lovely natural elements like coconut and lavender, most common soaps aren’t nearly as “clean” as you might think. Bodywashes and other liquid versions tend to contain synthetic ingredients like sodium lauryl sulfate, a foaming agent that is extremely drying to the skin and can be contaminated with carcinogens. Bar soaps, meanwhile, are based on synethics and petroleum products, which are equally drying as well as toxic to the environment. (When those suds wash down the drain, they ultimately wind up in bodies of water where they stunt plant and animal ecosystems.)

On the other hand, all-natural soaps are typically formulated with organic vegetable oils as their main ingredients. Bodywashes might include some vegetable glycerine and a little guar gum to add thickness, but that’s just about it. Compared to conventional versions, the natural options obviously represent the wiser choice – but is it better to go with liquids or bars?

Below, we’ve broken down four factors to consider when choosing your next sudsy product for the shower or the sink, plus a few surprising tips and tricks.

1. Which lathers best?

Although bars and liquids tend to make the same volume of suds on bare hands, liquid soaps usually create a richer lather on loofahs and washcloths. Regardless, you’ll get more bubbles for your buck and conserve the soap for longer if you use one of those scrubbing tools instead of applying the formula directly to your hands.

2. Which lasts longer?

Bar soaps last longer than liquid soaps. To further sustain a bar’s lifespan, store it in a dry, well-drained spot instead of a damp dish, so it doesn’t melt away when it’s not in use.

3. Which is more sanitary?

A lot of people believe that liquid soaps are more sanitary than bar soaps, but let’s debunk that myth. Numerous studies have shown that even though there’s a tiny bit more bacteria on a used bar of than a brand new one, it all gets rinsed off as it’s being used, right along with the grime on your hands. In other words, we can call this one a wash.

4. Which is best for the environment?

Bar soap usually comes in less packaging, which is a plus. But bodywash in environmentally friendly packaging can definitely hold its own. Look for a bottle that’s made of an eco-friendly material like PET plastic—it’s produced without leaving any toxic chemicals behind, and it’s the most easily and widely recycled plastic in the world.

Credit to https://clementinedaily.com

Top 12 hotel safety tips travelers should never ignore

These days, travel is no Sunday picnic and when you finally stumble into the lobby of your hotel, you may be tired, dirty, and in a hurry to get cleaned up, get some sleep, or get to the first item on your agenda.

Unfortunately, this is no time to let your guard down. If you’re traveling on business, you’re probably traveling alone and these tips are even more important to follow.

The following are the top hotel safety tips culled from the experts.

Upon arrival

1. Stay with your luggage – if you walk into the lobby ahead of your luggage, it could be snatched. Keep your luggage nearby too, because if the lobby is busy, enterprising thieves can take advantage of the distraction.

2. Ask for a room that’s not on the ground floor (it’s too easy to break in). Many safety experts recommend staying between the third and sixth floors – where rooms are high enough to avoid easy break-ins, but low enough to be reached by fire engine ladders.

During check-in

3. Most reputable hotels with honest staff know not to give out names or room numbers, but it’s still known to happen. If your room number is compromised (i.e., announced out loud), ask to be given another room. You never know who is listening and your room number is a matter of personal security.

4. Don’t set your credit card on the check-in counter – it’s too easy for a thief to capture the numbers with a good camera. And when it’s handed back to you, be sure it’s your credit card and not someone else’s or a bogus card.

5. Ask for two business cards with the hotel name and address. Place one by the phone in your room. If there is an emergency, and you call for help, you’ll have the name and address of your location. Place the other in your pocket or purse. If you have to take a cab or get lost, you can show the driver your location and avoid being taken to the wrong hotel.

In your room

6. If a valet has accompanied you to your room, block the door open while you check the room. Look in the closet, in the shower, and behind the curtains before you shut the door or release the valet.

7. Check the lock to be sure it’s functioning properly.  Make sure that the door has a deadbolt and keep it locked whenever you are in the room.

8. Use a door wedge to further secure the door – especially when you are sleeping or in the shower. Crooks are not always caught and may not have a record, so they can get hired by hotels where they have excellent access to spare room keys. Some criminals have been known to wait until they hear you in the shower before robbing your room or attacking you.

9. Place your flashlight or headlamp by the bead. If there’s an alarm or the electricity goes out, you’ll have the light you need to navigate an unfamiliar building.

When you leave

10. Lock the items you won’t be carrying with you, such as your laptop or other electronics, in the room safe. Modern hotels with a safe that lets you select your own combination are safer than those with keys. Don’t leave your passport behind.

11. If the safe in your room doesn’t appear safe, lock valuables in the hotel safe, but be sure to get a written receipt for your items and ask about the coverage for loss. Most hotels do not accept liability for items left in the guestroom safes but they will for those locked in the hotel safe.

12. If you lose your key or room entry card, report it to the hotel immediately and ask to be moved to another room. You can’t assume you ‘lost’ it – it may have been stolen from you by someone with malicious intent.

Oh, and one more thing: be wary of using the remote – that’s likely to be the germiest thing in the room.  Slide it into one of those small clean trash bags or wrap it in a wash cloth before pressing the buttons.

Credit to https://www.travelinsurancereview.net